Intro

While the Constitution still reads, “All Men are created equal,” we know our country is so much more. Many of our proudest moments center around the fight for equality. The Woman Suffrage Procession, Stonewall, Selma. Roe v. Wade, Obergefell v. Hodges. The 19th Amendment and the Civil Rights Act. Far too many of these moments happened 50+ years ago. We’re ready for an overhaul. 

 

Our Goals

  • End discrimination based on gender, sex, and sexual identity. All of it. Period. 
  • Create programs and legislation that fight for equality based on intersectional needs identified by activists already in those spaces, affecting everything from our schools to our foreign relations. 
  • Level the playing field for access to affordable healthcare, and remove unnecessary gatekeeping. 
  • Fight for equal pay, and undo the systems that have led to this disparity in the first place. 
  • Provide wraparound survivor-led support, free from judgment or bias, for those who have experienced harassment, violence, and trauma. 

 

Why

We are stronger when we stand together. For a long time, the fight for equality and inclusion has fallen to women, the LGBTQIA+ community, and people of color. Their intersecting needs have led to powerful allegiances working together to move mountains and enact real change that benefits everyone, especially in underserved populations.

 

Women’s needs are vastly overlooked on issues from income to healthcare. Women in the US do an average of 242 minutes of unpaid work every day while men do 1481, and as of 2018, still only earn 85% compared to men in similar jobs2. And that doesn’t account for racial wage gaps. 

 

In healthcare, the needs of women, especially women of color, are often dismissed. In particular, our country is in a maternal mortality crisis that exists squarely at the intersection of race and gender: black and indigenous mothers are three times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes3. This is a problem at the core of our healthcare system, and is one that cannot wait to be addressed. 

 

Even today, 42% of LGBTQIA+ youth say their community isn’t accepting of their identity4; 20-40% of 1.6 million homeless American youth identify as LGBTQIA+5. 40% of transgender adults have attempted suicide in their lifetime6. Equality affects more than quality of life. It affects life itself. There are still 25 states where it is not illegal to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation in healthcare, housing, and education7. This must change. Biological sex or assigned gender should never be a barrier for anything

How We Plan to Do It

Civil Rights and Protections:

  • Make illegal any housing, employment, or financial assistance discrimination on the basis of gender, sex, and sexual identity. 
  • Mandate the federal recognition of non-binary gender identity, including in federal documents.
  • Employ policies that take into account the intersectional nature of discrimination. 
  • Pass the Gay and Trans Panic Defense Act (H.R. 3133). 
  • Close the wage gap by appropriating funds to the DOL to study methods for increasing wage and benefit transparency8.

 

Families and Children:

  • Pass the Every Child Deserves a Family Act to prevent discrirmination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or marital status in the foster care system.
  • Pass the Student Non-Discrimination Act to prevent discrimination in the education system.
  • Create national standards for paid family leave (currently there are none).
  • Incentivizing a focus on diversity, inclusion, and intersectionality in our school systems.

 

Healthcare:

  • Ban discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity in healthcare, including a ban on gender-affirming treatment exclusions. 
  • Take on inequities in healthcare, especially at the intersection of race and gender.
  • Ban medically unnecessary nonconsensual surgery on intersex children.
  • Provide mental health support to anyone who seeks it, including minors who otherwise wouldn’t have autonomy due to parental control over healthcare.
  • Increase access to reproductive care including birth control, abortion, prenatal care, early life care, resources and classes for new parents, and more, focusing first on communities with very little or no access.
  • Increase access to high-quality medical care and emotional support for incarcerated pregnant women and mothers9.
  • Provide grants to nonprofit groups that network and accredit milk banks for families whose infants cannot consume formula and who cannot produce safe breast milk.
  • Provide funding for wraparound survivor-led trauma support for those who have experienced harassment or violence. 
References:
  1. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/this-is-how-much-more-unpaid-work-women-do-than-men-2017-03-07
  2. https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/03/22/gender-pay-gap-facts/
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2019/p0905-racial-ethnic-disparities-pregnancy-deaths.html
  4. https://www.hrc.org/youth-report/view-and-share-statistics
  5. https://transequality.org/issues/housing-homelessness
  6. https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/comedian-s-death-underscores-high-suicide-rate-among-transgender-people-n1067546
  7. https://www.lgbtmap.org/equality-maps/non_discrimination_laws
  8. https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/es_2272018_information_is_power_harris_pp.pdf
  9. https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/committee-opinion/articles/2011/11/health-care-for-pregnant-and-postpartum-incarcerated-women-and-adolescent-females